Index of Titles Filed Under 'Science'

PublisherMeson Press2015
In 1985, the French philosopher Jean-François Lyotard curated a groundbreaking exhibition called Les Immatériaux at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. The exhibition showed how telecommunication technologies were beginning to impact every aspect of life. At the same time, it was a material demonstration of what Lyotard called the post-modern condition. This book features a previously unpublished report by Jean-François Lyotard on the conception of Les Immatériaux and its relation to postmodernity. Reviewing the historical significance of the exhibition, his text is accompanied by twelve contemporary meditations. The philosophers, art historians, and artists analyse this important moment in the history of media and theory, and reflect on the new material conditions brought ...
Science has to generate output. Art has to cater to an audience. Could art and science join forces to free science from definite outputs and art from definite audiences? Or would art then also be measured by its outcome and science by its audience? Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with artists Julieta Aranda, Marco Roso, and Elena Mazzi.
“The first episode Oceanizing History, emerged from a conversation with professor and curator Greg Dvorak. Author of the book Coral and Concrete: Remembering Kwajalein Atoll Between Japan, America, and the Marshall Islands (2018), Greg teaches at Waseda University in Tokyo and researches the postcolonial histories of Japan and the USA in Oceania. His work is related to his personal biography, spending part of his childhood on a US military base in Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. The meeting with Greg took place in mid-April 2020, when the global lockdown was already becoming a new normal. He was in Tokyo ...
The third episode of the Corona Under the Ocean chapter, featuring anthropology professor Cynthia Chou, is dedicated to the Orang Suku Laut, a nomadic community from the Malay world sea in Southeast Asia. Thanks to more than three decades of research, Cynthia Chou’s work brings us closer to the worldview and life practices of the Orang Suku Laut, for whom humans are just another element among the many creatures that inhabit oceans and land. Continually moved by the tides, their ancestral relationship with the environment not only puts many aspects of modern societies into question, but shows that another kind ...
The fourth episode of the Corona Under the Ocean series, with agent of healing and artist Tabita Rezaire, is dedicated to the memory of water and its existence in flow within bodies. Water has Memory is the result of an intimate, personal, and mostly unscripted conversation between Tabita Rezaire and Sonia Fernandez Pan. It even includes environmental elements, such as rain, showing how words, feelings, and ideas are also part of the flow of life that circulates through bodies. The great connecting element of this conversation is water, understood beyond its usual contexts to think through connections and interactions including ...
This episode, featuring marine biologist Marah J. Hardt, is dedicated to the vitalism and resilience of the ocean. Outlining her personal journey as a researcher, Marah J. Hardt provides a propositional critique of our relationship with the maritime environment, present but not always visible on a global scale. Understanding ocean research as a necessarily interdisciplinary practice, her scientific practice highlights the importance of storytelling as a tool for dissemination of ideas. In We are Ocean Life, she not only reminds us that all forms of life, including human life, come from the ocean, but also brings us closer to the ...
Our nature inclines us to listen to stories, not to lists, charts, and equations. To change our mind, we need a compelling narrative that turns obstacles into challenges and chances into hopes. The role of art is to foster that transformation, but also to spoil it wherever it’s lame. Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with artists Lena Maria Thüring and Teresa Solar.
From the first human artistic expression in cave paintings until now, black has been constantly reinvented by art. Like other 20th-century artists (Rothko, Malevic, Klein) before him have done, Belgian Frederik De Wilde explores the nature of colors and produces monochromatic works, but focusing on black in a radical and scientific manner. In Hostage, as art historian Elise Aspord explains, he has created a material made up of a vertical alignment of nanotubes of carbon that can absorb almost all rays of light, thus giving a new universal reference for black. This work is the result of a close collaboration between scientists and ...
PublisherMeson Press2017
Computer simulations are omnipresent media in today’s knowledge production. For scientific endeavors such as the detection of gravitational waves and the exploration of subatomic worlds, simulations are essential; however, the epistemic status of computer simulations is rather controversial as they are neither just theory nor just experiment. Therefore, computer simulations have challenged well-established insights and common scientific practices as well as our very understanding of knowledge. This volume contributes to the ongoing discussion on the epistemic position of computer simulations in a variety of physical disciplines, such as quantum optics, quantum mechanics, and computational physics. Originating from an interdisciplinary event, it ...
PublisherThinkbelt2019
Tracing the change in scope of political responsibility in Botswana amidst unchecked development, anthropologist Julie Livingston offers an urgent parable for understanding the world as a web of relationships that condense past, present, and future.
PublisherFiktion2019
It’s Me! is science fiction in the literal sense. As modern science seems to be incapable of explaining consciousness – specifically, the binding of distributively processed, neuronal microexperiences into unitary, experiential objects apprehended by a unitary phenomenal self – David Pearce argues that we will need to revise our notions of both the intrinsic nature of the physical and the quasiclassicality of neurons. As a consequence, his essay “Nonmaterialist Physicalism“ gives a novel, experimentally testable prediction of quantum superpositions (“Schrödinger’s cat” states) of neuronal feature-processors in the central nervous system at sub-femtosecond timescales. In Ingo Niermann’s companion piece “How the ...
If it’s already difficult to protect nature in our own country, how do we protect nature in the extraterritorial sea? And who is there to protect the nature—and the people—of a country that is disappearing into the sea? Listen to Chus Martínez in conversation with Francesca Mussi, a researcher in international law.
PublisherStrelka Institute2020
The foreseeable future of planet earth will unfold in responsability not only to cool its surface but to design and embrace life beyond a countdown to ecological collapse. Atmospheric insulation is accumulating in response to the energy infrastructures of human activity, calling for a re-composition of instruments already in place. The Lexicon of Climate Intervention assembles seemingly unrelated instruments that collectively demonstrate how to bring these challenges back down to earth, mitigating future emissions and rewriting historical ones.The unifying factor of all lexicon entries, what renders them comparable to and interactive with one another is their contribution to a scale ...
Publisherargobooks2016
Between 1950 and 2010, the Institute for Scientific Film (IWF) in Göttingen released nearly 8,000 scientific films. Of these, 3,100 were catalogued in the ENCYCLOPEDIA CINEMATOGRAPHICA. The purpose of the archive was to document in filmic “specimens” any type of terrestrial motional process—isolated and stripped of all incidental elements. The reproduction and growth of bacteria, chip formation in metal processing, or the passing of sand grains through the meshes of a sieve were the subject of filmic analyses as well as human gymnastic movements or plant growth. Distinguishing between human and non-human processes was irrelevant for this concept. Only the ...
PublisherThe Volume Project2016
The Lesson of Zoology first appeared in the trash heap of contemporary Lisbon. While researching the role of Lisbon’s Geographical Society in one of the first planetary colonizations, we happened upon an antiquarian bookshop with seemingly endless piles of natural history lithographs. Among them, The Lesson stood out as an especially compelling meta-image of just what a lesson is—an ordering of nature, by way of presentation, about who intended to possess the earth.
PublisherUrbanomic2013
Anne-Françoise Schmid introduces the enterprise of nonstandard or generic epistemology by way of the relation between science and art.
PublisherUrbanomic2016
In this review-essay, Giuseppe Longo outlines some important reasons for reading Sergio Chibbaro, Lamberto Rondoni, and Angelo Vulpiani’s Reductionism, Emergence and Levels of Reality: The Importance of Being Borderline, and reflects on the damage done by reductionist models of, and in, science

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