Index of Titles Filed Under 'Subjectivation'

Cover art
PublisherUrbanomic1998
In these interviews dating from 1998, Châtelet amplifies the major themes of To Live and Think Like Pigs, discusses his method of dramatisation and the crucial importance of style; and touches on subjects from dialectics to dope smoking, from Yoplait to slavery, along the way introducing some of the book’s key concepts: cybercattle, the average man, the tapeworm-citizen, and of course the pitiful couple Cyber-Gideon and Turbo-Bécassine.
Cover art
PublisherBrand-New-Life2018
In his long-term artistic project Theatrum Botanicum, Uriel Orlow considers plants as actors on a political stage: protagonists of colonial trade, flower diplomacy, or bio-piracy. As such, they serve as a prism through which environmental colonial history can be re-negotiated. Theatrum Botanicum can be read as an attempt to decolonize both, history and nature. And for decolonizing nature, it is crucial how plants are considered as acting and living beings. If they tell stories about colonialism, how are they brought to speak?
Cover art
With the term chrononormativity, Elizabeth Freeman describes a timeliness that is following a normative regime. A “deviant chronopolitics,” she says, is one that envisions “relations across time and between times” that upturns developmentalist narratives of history (Freeman, 58, 63). Lorenza and many others have become agents in a deviant chronopolitics and the cripping of art history. Crip Magazine collects artifacts of this transhistorical crip (sub)culture. It relates to historical struggles, aiming to create trans-temporary connections and communities across time. Desire, time traveling, and fragmented bodies are some of the themes that connect the different pieces in this volume…
Cover art
“If you haven’t already done so, walk away from the desk where you picked up this guide and out into the great, high space of the atrium. Isn’t this a wonderful place? It’s uplifting. It’s like a Gothic cathedral. You can feel your soul rise up with the building around you.” These are the first words of the official audio guide at the Guggenheim Bilbao as heard on Andrea Fraser’s video Little Frank and His Carp (2001). Shot with hidden cameras, Fraser’s seven-minute video piece documents an unauthorized intervention into the museum designed by the architect Frank Gehry, the “Little ...
Cover art
6-years old Arturo Campagna discusses children’s literature and dispenses advice to writers for children.
Cover art
PublisherJoshua Citarella2022
A unique look into online memetic subcultures where Gen Z teens explore radical politics like eco-extremism, neoreaction, anarcho-primitivism, transhumanism, anarcho-capitalism, the alt-right, the post-left, egoism and cyber-nihilism.
Cover art
PublisherJoshua Citarella2022
I recently spoke with one of my longtime favorite accounts: @The_Political_Compass. We chat about her background, the evolution of radical online subcultures and the ever-expanding Overton window.
Cover art
PublisherBrand-New-Life2018
Those who think of contemporary art as a cultural activity tend to rely on performance to bring a degree of variation to the exhibition format. Given its nature as an event, performance can lend a program a rhythm. Contradictory Statements, Michèle Graf and Selina Grüter’s proposition for Fri Art, involved a series of appropriative strategies as well as a method of what you could call programming performance. In doing so, it deviated from the prevailing tendency, which establishes a dialectical opposition between performance and exhibition – in much the same way that the living oppose death.
Cover art
PublisherHatje Cantz2012
Cornelius Castoriadis never had a notebook. He wrote on the paper that was at hand. Whether it was the back of Red Cross ration tickets, the blank section of a conference schedule, or the reverse side of old documents from his workplaces such as the OECD and the Hôpital Henri-Rousselle, like a keen-eyed magpie he worked on the paper that was nearby. He sketched out his thoughts in a manner that combined an acerbic and polemical wit with an unflagging commitment to the ideals of freedom. It reveals a style that includes an alarming sense of political urgency, a fastidious ...
Cover art
PublisherEva Egermann2017
The images that we see around us everyday limit the horizon of our imagination and our ability to think up things beyond it. That concept is what Frederic Jameson calls the political unconscious. Crip Magazine aims to expand these limitations on the world of imagination. This issue includes contributions about crip pop culture, art and radical social movements, deals with pain, or opens up a transformative perspective on body issues and bodily relations. It is a collection of various kinds of crip materials (Crip Art Resources). We asked artists to work on historical artifacts and graphic materials (for instance magazine ...
Cover art
PublisherEva Egermann2012
What are the possible escape routes from the normative conditions of neoliberalism? Via the figure of the freak that cannot be defined by a norm from that it deviates from and is in-compatible with? Or via a society of equal body-subjects? Via strategies of ambiguity or the right to opacity, beyond definitive identity ascriptions? Via politics of representation that deal not with the portrayal but rather with the construction of reality? Via a re-politicization of everyday life and alternative narratives of appropriation and resistance from the past? Via technologies of de-normalization and disruption of the existing order? We think all of ...
Cover art
The (political) power of memes has moved beyond virtual images. The distinction between the virtual and ‘real life’ no longer applies, or perhaps was never really there. Their effects (or should we say affects?) are moving through digital infrastructures, policy, regulations and bodies. If memes are used as a tool by the alt-right to mobilize people to storm the Capitol and play a substantial role in the Ukrainian war, can they also be used by the left to spark a revolution, as memetic warfare is more immediate and accessible than real-life demonstrations? What kind of labor would that require? What ...

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. Read our privacy policy to learn more. Accept

Join Our Mailing List