Index of Titles Filed Under 'Technology'

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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
Eve Bailey and I recorded this conversation in her studio in Crown Heights (Brooklyn) surrounded by her tools and artworks. We talk about her work that consistently engages the body to ‘conquer’ the sculptures she constructs with her own hands. We also discuss about how, despite the fact that her pieces are based on her own body, each body has a chance to appropriate them with no prejudice — their aesthetics allowing so — and eventually find a point of equilibrium, unique for each body. Toward the end of the podcast, she talks about her current research that explores association ...
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This publication presents Peter Eisenman’s Biozentrum project, an expansion of Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, from 1987. In the competition brief, the program of the complex included biotechnology, molecular biology and biochemistry research laboratories and support spaces. The design process used biological concepts and procedures to generate the geometrical pattern that establishes the location, dimension and form of the complex. The iterations of DNA molecules in the production of the protein collagen were at the base of the fractal geometry guiding the project design. These pairs of figures, with a gap in between them, were the base forms Eisenman adopted ...
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PublisherThe Funambulist2014
This conversation with Alexander Weheliye is built upon the critique he made of the work of Giorgio Agamben, in particular in his essentialization of the muselmann in the context of the Holocaust. Alexander argues that slavery functions as a better paradigm to understand the “layering” of bare lives and the racial aspects that this understanding involves. He explains how he is interested in finding other ways to “claim humanity” than the traditional judicial one that attributes this status in a retroactive manner to suffering bodies. In order to do so, we evoke the works of major African-American and black Caribbean thinkers such as Hortense ...
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The DATA browser book series explores new thinking and practice at the intersection of contemporary art, digital culture and politics. The series takes theory or criticism not as a fixed set of tools or practices, but rather as an evolving chain of ideas that recognise the conditions of their own making. The term “browser” is useful in pointing to the framing device through which data is delivered over information networks and processed by algorithms. Whereas a conventional understanding of browsing suggests surface readings and cursory engagement with the material, the series celebrates the potential of browsing for dynamic rearrangement and ...
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PublisherDroste Effect2016
Bulletin #4. Chance and control. Photography, video and the web. Part I 01 If something eludes us 02 Video-photographic devices Since the coming of image technologies (and particularly with photography, video, and the Web) contemporary culture has lost control over images, which became more and more independent from their author. Luca Panaro formulates his thesis by reinterpreting the works of theorists (Susan Sontag, Walter Benjamin, Vilém Flusser), writers (Luigi Pirandello, Italo Calvino, Penelope Lively), even film directors (Buster Keaton, Michelangelo Antonioni, Wayne Wang), and finally contemporary artists (Franco Vaccari, Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, Wolfgang Staehle, Roberto Cuoghi, Carlo Zanni, Eva and Franco Mattes). Translation ...
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PublisherDroste Effect2016
Bulletin #5. Chance and control. Photography, video and the web. Part II Part II: 02 Online filming 03 An art that generates itself Part I on Bulletin #4 Since the coming of image technologies (and particularly with photography, video, and the Web) contemporary culture has lost control over images, which became more and more independent from their author. Luca Panaro formulates his thesis by reinterpreting the works of theorists (Susan Sontag, Walter Benjamin, Vilém Flusser), writers (Luigi Pirandello, Italo Calvino, Penelope Lively), even film directors (Buster Keaton, Michelangelo Antonioni, Wayne Wang), and finally contemporary artists (Franco Vaccari, Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, Wolfgang Staehle, Roberto Cuoghi, Carlo ...
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Publishere-flux2014
One common explanation for why intellectual property makes no sense in an era of file-sharing uses the example of what happens when you copy a file on a computer. Copy-Paste: a second file has been produced, but the original is unaltered. Now it has a sibling, a partner, a twin. And if they keep reproducing themselves in this way, no problem. Which is to say that, at least in the digital domain, the entire calculus of scarcity is very different from the material domain. The difference between a single entity, two entities, or a billion is almost nil. Under these ...
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This publication presents Expanding Sphere and Iris Dome, two projets by Chuck Hoberman, in their context during the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. Chuck Hoberman’s work focuses on the notion of transformable design: objects, structures and spaces that can change size and shape through the respective movements of their parts. The Expanding Sphere and Iris Dome could be considered as prototypes that can be later adapted for multiple uses — from toys to buildings. The development of controlling surfaces defined by geometric transformation, with zero material thickness, has been combined with the rigorous design and engineering of hinged and folding ...
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From the first human artistic expression in cave paintings until now, black has been constantly reinvented by art. Like other 20th-century artists (Rothko, Malevic, Klein) before him have done, Belgian Frederik De Wilde explores the nature of colors and produces monochromatic works, but focusing on black in a radical and scientific manner. In Hostage, as art historian Elise Aspord explains, he has created a material made up of a vertical alignment of nanotubes of carbon that can absorb almost all rays of light, thus giving a new universal reference for black. This work is the result of a close collaboration between scientists and ...
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PublisherUrbanomic2020
Self-assembly + replicating capacity: Laura Tripaldi on how viruses went from representing the technological future of humanity to being the absolute emblem of pandemic extinction.
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PublisherUrbanomic2015
Three presentations from the 2015 event explore the historical and contemporary relationship between choreography, technology, control, and subjectivation
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PublisherLuuse2018
The Hershey fonts are a collection of vector fonts developed c. 1967 by Dr. Allen Vincent Hershey at the Naval Weapons Laboratory, originally designed to be rendered using vectors on early cathode ray tube displays. Decomposing curves to connected straight lines allowed Hershey to produce complex typographic designs. In their original form the font data consists simply of a series of coordinates, meant to be connected by straight lines on the screen. SIL Open Font License

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