Index of Titles Filed Under 'Technology'

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This publication presents Peter Eisenman’s Biozentrum project, an expansion of Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, from 1987. In the competition brief, the program of the complex included biotechnology, molecular biology and biochemistry research laboratories and support spaces. The design process used biological concepts and procedures to generate the geometrical pattern that establishes the location, dimension and form of the complex. The iterations of DNA molecules in the production of the protein collagen were at the base of the fractal geometry guiding the project design. These pairs of figures, with a gap in between them, were the base forms Eisenman adopted ...
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The DATA browser book series explores new thinking and practice at the intersection of contemporary art, digital culture and politics. The series takes theory or criticism not as a fixed set of tools or practices, but rather as an evolving chain of ideas that recognise the conditions of their own making. The term “browser” is useful in pointing to the framing device through which data is delivered over information networks and processed by algorithms. Whereas a conventional understanding of browsing suggests surface readings and cursory engagement with the material, the series celebrates the potential of browsing for dynamic rearrangement and ...
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Publishere-flux2014
One common explanation for why intellectual property makes no sense in an era of file-sharing uses the example of what happens when you copy a file on a computer. Copy-Paste: a second file has been produced, but the original is unaltered. Now it has a sibling, a partner, a twin. And if they keep reproducing themselves in this way, no problem. Which is to say that, at least in the digital domain, the entire calculus of scarcity is very different from the material domain. The difference between a single entity, two entities, or a billion is almost nil. Under these ...
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This publication presents Expanding Sphere and Iris Dome, two projets by Chuck Hoberman, in their context during the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. Chuck Hoberman’s work focuses on the notion of transformable design: objects, structures and spaces that can change size and shape through the respective movements of their parts. The Expanding Sphere and Iris Dome could be considered as prototypes that can be later adapted for multiple uses — from toys to buildings. The development of controlling surfaces defined by geometric transformation, with zero material thickness, has been combined with the rigorous design and engineering of hinged and folding ...
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From the first human artistic expression in cave paintings until now, black has been constantly reinvented by art. Like other 20th-century artists (Rothko, Malevic, Klein) before him have done, Belgian Frederik De Wilde explores the nature of colors and produces monochromatic works, but focusing on black in a radical and scientific manner. In Hostage, as art historian Elise Aspord explains, he has created a material made up of a vertical alignment of nanotubes of carbon that can absorb almost all rays of light, thus giving a new universal reference for black. This work is the result of a close collaboration between scientists and ...
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PublisherUrbanomic2020
Self-assembly + replicating capacity: Laura Tripaldi on how viruses went from representing the technological future of humanity to being the absolute emblem of pandemic extinction.
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PublisherUrbanomic2015
Three presentations from the 2015 event explore the historical and contemporary relationship between choreography, technology, control, and subjectivation
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The Institute of Network Cultures (INC) analyzes and shapes the terrain of network cultures through events, publications, and online dialogue. Our projects evolve around digital publishing, alternative revenue models, online video and design, digital counter culture and much more. The INC was founded in 2004 by Geert Lovink, following his appointment within the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. A key focus is the establishment of sustainable research networks. Emerging critical topics are identified and shaped in a practical sense. Interdisciplinary in character, the INC brings together researchers, artists, activists, programmers, designers, and students and teachers.
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PublisherThinkbelt2020
What would an ideal internet experience be like? Joanne McNeil explores the 30-year history of online life—the communities and identities and hazards—and imagines how we, the users, might recover some of the potential of our technologies.
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PublisherFlugschriften2021
Until recently, there has been a subtle but firm stigma around speaking against the Machine. (Specifically, the Internet.) Since the successful counter-revolution of neoliberal capital, launched in the 1980s against the organicist counter-cultural experiments of the 1960s and 70s, any voices raised against the digital revolution have been dismissed as romantically nostalgic at best, and conservatively neo-Luddite at worst. (Never mind that Ned Lud’s followers, protesting against weaving machines at the beginning of the 19th century, were not necessarily our first “technophobes” but rather an activist group especially attuned to the economic consequences of out- sourcing labor to automated contraptions.) ...
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Marko Batista is an artist working at the intersection of science and art. By creating hybrid technological, electromagnetic or chemical systems, he confronts the mystification of technology while also opening up new ways of thinking about technology. With his experimental systems, which bring together the abovementioned fields, he expands the sphere of human perception and the phenomenology of unstable audio-visual systems in space and time. This book brings together four different perspectives on Marko Batista’s work. Jurij Krpan’s text analyses Marko Batista’s work chronologically and positions it in the Slovenian as well as the broader cultural space. Andreja Hribernik tackles the ...
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PublisherMomus2018
Two art and technology critics, Nora Khan and Mike Pepi, discuss pushing for a rigorous critical discourse in a creative field that can flatten evaluative distinctions in favor of zealotry for invention. “Criticism of a tool that’s presented as neutral when it really is a piece of social engineering is incredibly hard to do, and there really isn’t a model for criticism in this space,” says Khan. In this far-ranging discussion that touches on the critical distance and yet humanism required of writing on the internet, surveillance, and AI, Khan and Pepi assert that tools aren’t divorced from their makers, ...

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