Index of Titles Filed Under 'Time'

2013
This entry was included in Library Stack as part of a collection by Howie Chen

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Urbanatomy‘s venture into e-publishing, through the Amazon Kindle Store, begins with a series of Urban Future Pamphlets, threaded upon the theme of time. Each of these volumes is something over 7,000 words in length, with material drawn from the period prior to the present — and hopefully mature — version of the Urban Future blog.

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Devised and written by David Reinfurt, compiled and presented by Dan Fox, and produced in the context of ‘ALWAYS LIFT INKING ROLLERS WHEN PRESS IS NOT IN OPERATION. IF ROLLERS ARE LEFT TURNING ON THE DRUM THE INK WILL DRY FASTER AND THE ROLLERS WILL BE SUBJECT TO NEEDLESS WEAR’ organized by Will Holder at The Banff Centre, Banff, Alberta, Canada.  “Things in their alleged places. Things where they think they should be, where they prefer to be. All of the things, just where they are. Things with things of their own. Things obeying no rules, following no orders, filling no ...

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PublisherPARSE2016
When asked to respond to the question “what is time?” for their presentation at the 2015 PARSE conference on the theme, both Bruno Latour and Simon Critchley deflected in their answer. Latour asked “what is the time”, and Critchley made the locution plural: times. In composite, and as an appropriate introduction to this issue of the PARSE Journal, with its complexity of artistic, philosophical, political and social thought, we might ask: “what are the times?”

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David Reinfurt is a design polymath operating at the intersection of design, publishing, curation, and exhibitions. His studio, O-R-G, is now a small software company “that programs, publishes, and sells apps, websites, screensavers, and other small chunks of code”. With Stuart Bailey, he’s the co-founder of Dexter Sinister and with Bailey and Angie Keefer, he publishes The Serving Library. In July, I interviewed David about his work across mediums and how they intersect, the fluid boundaries of graphic design and the type of writing around design he enjoys the most.

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PublisherO-R-G2018
In 1965, Bruno Munari designed a small black box — the austere 15-cm steel cube housed four aluminum cones, each painted half-red and half-green and set to spin at four distinct speeds on an 18-minute cycle to produce a very slowly turning composite color moving from red to green. Munari called it the Tetracono and its function was to show forms in the process of becoming: The art of the past has accustomed us to seeing nature as static: a sunset, a face, an apple, all static. People go to nature looking for images such as these static things, whereas an apple is in ...

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PublisherKunsthalle Wien2015
The exhibition The Future of Memory is accompanied by an e-book, available as a free download here. The publication introduces essays by Clint Burnham, Michael Connor, and Nicolaus Schafhausen, alongside a detailed presentation of the works exhibited in the show, written by co-authors Marie Egger, Emilie Lauriola and Vanessa Joan Müller. Digital communication and virtual interlacing shape our world today and influence our collective memory. Remembering the past, experiencing the present and imagining the future all meld to become part of a seemingly equivalent imagery in digital space. The Future of Memory critically challenges constructions of reality and investigates the conditions ...

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PublisherLiverpool Biennial2016
The noisy buzz of the mains electricity power supply has been one of our urban environment’s most persistent background noises. One day in 1996 Dr Catalin Grigoras realised that the electricity wasn’t just making noise, but in fact singing… The UK national electrical grid delivers power across the country. This mains power supply makes a constant humming sound, yet there are tiny changes to the frequency of this sound every second. Most recordings made in the UK have a trace of mains hum on them and this can be forensically analysed to determine the time and date they were made, and ...

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Publisher[Name]2016
Time is changing. Human agency and experience lose their primacy in the complexity and scale of social organization today. The leading actors are instead complex systems, infrastructures and networks in which the future replaces the present as the structuring condition of time. As the political Left and Right struggle to deal with this new situation, we are increasingly wholly pre-empted and post-everything. The contributions in The Time Complex. Post-Contemporary re-localize the present as part of a changed, speculative time complex and draw a precise diagnosis of the situation in order to negotiate speculative predictions of a future presence.

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PublisherO-R-G2015
Dutch graphic designer Karel Martens has made clocks for years. Starting somewhere around 1968, Karel attached new faces to existing clock mechanisms to produce graphic compositions, which by their nature, are constantly changing. This screensaver works the same way. Based on a wall clock designed by Karel for his exhibition at P! this fall in New York, the screensaver software uses three yellow and blue spinning disks to display the hours, minutes, and seconds of the current time. It does very little, other than spin contentedly. But, on the way, the passing of time produces a collection of graphic arrangements as ...

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PublisherUrbanomic2017
As the CCRU’s tangled time tales emerge from obscurity, Amy Ireland digs deeper into the sorcerous cybernetics of the time spiral, acceleration, and nonhuman poetics.

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PublisherPrinted on Paige2013
World Clock tells of 1440 incidents that take place around the world at each minute of a day. The novel was inspired by Stanislaw Lem’s “One Human Minute” and Harry Mathews’s “The Chronogram for 1998.” It celebrates the industrial concept of time and certain types of vigorous banality which are shared by all people throughout the world. This novel was generated with 165 lines of Python code, all of which were written by the author in about four hours on November 27, 2013. The only external data source that is used in the generation process is the computer’s time zone database. ...

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PublishersO-R-GHalmos2015
Time is like that — both point AND duration. This is how it can bend and warp. A week, a second, a season: all are specific and discrete, but none are the same. The present can be cut to any number of lengths, from a single electric pulse of an electronic circuit to the display period of a digital timepiece. Wyoscan is a reverse-engineered clock. It has been programmed to slowly render the current time from left to right, scanning across the screen, completing 1 cycle every 2 seconds (0.5 hz). You’ll notice that reading this clock requires more attention than usual, ...

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