Carl Andre

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PublisherCapricious2015
Although it looks like it, == is not the catalogue of an exhibition. It is exactly the opposite, it is an independent project, conceived ahead of an exhibition. In fact, Matt Keegan has devised an exhibition from the publication, rather than the traditional reverse. Even more, an unlimited number of venues may be produced. Emphasizing the wall as a page, each one provides a temporary container for ==’s various parts, allowing Matt Keegan to act as the protagonist for the fictive curatorial project.
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PublisherEqual Equal2015
A publication is a time capsule & transmitter from here to there, from you to me. Working from this basic statement: how has your work changed since your 2012 or 2015 contribution to ==? This question and timeline could be rephrased as: How has your life & work changed in the wake of Brexit, Trump’s presidency, and the move to the right in Europe. (The majority of contributors are based in the US and this prompt is not intended to romanticize Obama’s presidency or deny repressive administrations that have come before). It is not necessary to root your response in the 1st person, ...
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July, August, September 1969 was an exhibition organized by Seth Siegelaub consisting of works by eleven artists at eleven separate geographical locations. The trilingual catalogue—in English, French, and German—both documented and reproduced the diverse works, which ranged from fleeting events and performances to museum shows and open-ended environmental interventions. In each case, the respective artist was responsible for providing information on the work’s materials and design. The participating artists were Carl Andre (The Hague), Robert Barry (Baltimore), Daniel Buren (Paris), Jan Dibbets (Amsterdam), Douglas Huebler (Los Angeles), Joseph Kosuth (New Mexico), Sol LeWitt (Düsseldorf), Richard Long (Bristol, UK), N.E. Thing Co. Ltd. ...
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This book, also known as One Month, was organized by Seth Siegelaub and took the form of a page-a-day calendar for the month of March 1969. Siegelaub developed the book by assigning each of the 31 invited artists a specific day of the month (and its corresponding page) upon which they would construct a work. These text-based works were then collated and published by Siegelaub, leaving blank the pages assigned to artist who failed to respond. The participating artists were Carl Andre, Mike Asher, Terry Atkinson, Michael Baldwin, Robert Barry, Rick Barthelme, Iain Baxter, James Lee Byars, John Chamberlain, Ron Cooper, Barry ...
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Open Hearing is a monumental collection of statements originally published in the wake of the first public meeting of the Art Workers’ Coalition (AWC), at the School of Visual Arts in New York on April 10, 1969. The meeting was billed as “an open public hearing […] regarding museum reform” and the establishment of a program for the AWC, in which any and all art workers were invited to “testify.” It was a consummation of the group’s inception that January, in which the urgency of its foundational concerns and its potency as a rallying point for diverse critical voices were ...
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This catalogue, organized by Seth Siegelaub, both documents the works assembled to raise money for the United States Servicemen’s Fund (USSF) as well as inaugurates the fund’s art collection. The USSF was an organization established to promote free speech within the US military and was heavily engaged in anti-Vietnam War activity through both the funding and support of independent GI newspapers as well as various cultural actions and events. It also worked to defend the legal rights of GIs. Participating artists include Keith Sonnier, Robert Morris, Robert Smithson, Robert Murray, Robert Huot, David Diao, Gene Davis, Al Held, Robert Ryman, Alex ...
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This book exhibition—also known as the Xerox Book—was organized and published by Seth Siegelaub in 1968. Both presenting a range of artists associated with Siegelaub’s curatorial practice and utilizing unconventional modes of exhibition, this book marks ongoing attempt by Siegelaub to show work outside of the gallery setting, and his first time showing an exhibition in book form. Furthermore, Siegelaub asked each artist in the exhibition to create 25 pages of work that responded to the photocopy format. Though the Xerox process proved financially unfeasible—the works ultimately being reproduced through the more conventional printing press—the book continued to be referred ...

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