Dan Graham

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Consumption Junction is about the paradoxical intersection of environmentally sustainable activity and daily acts of consumption. The works of art gathered together for this exhibition and book share a conceptual language that addresses a range of topics from excessive spending, pollution, and urban infrastructure to alternative transportation, suburban sprawl, and recycling. They offer insightful cultural criticisms and whimsical, imaginative alternatives set somewhere between reality and fiction. In all cases they suggest the need for a worldwide environmental movement that responds to our ecologically precarious moment.
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PublisherAfterall2012
Dan Graham’s Rock My Religion (1982–84) is a video essay populated by punk and rock performers (Patti Smith, Jim Morrison, Black Flag and Glenn Branca) and historical figures (including Ann Lee, founder of the Shakers). This coming together of several narrative voice-overs, of singing and shouting voices, of jarring sounds and text overlaid onto shaky, gritty images, proposes a historical genealogy of rock music and an ambitious thesis on the origins of America. In this illustrated book, Kodwo Eshun examines this landmark work of contemporary moving image in relation to Graham’s wider body of work and to the broader culture of ...
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Of Other Spaces asks us to consider the ways in which spaces are charged with authority, and both serve and suppress our actions and ways of relating. It follows within a discourse on the sociocultural conditions embedded in different spaces, institutional and otherwise. The concept of “other spaces” is inspired by the philosophy of Michel Foucault, from his 1967 essay, Of Other Spaces, Heterotopias, on the social relations and cultural conditions associated with the weight of space, architecture, and history. Foucault’s essay is reprinted in this book.
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Open Hearing is a monumental collection of statements originally published in the wake of the first public meeting of the Art Workers’ Coalition (AWC), at the School of Visual Arts in New York on April 10, 1969. The meeting was billed as “an open public hearing […] regarding museum reform” and the establishment of a program for the AWC, in which any and all art workers were invited to “testify.” It was a consummation of the group’s inception that January, in which the urgency of its foundational concerns and its potency as a rallying point for diverse critical voices were ...

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