Karel Martens

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PublishersP!WkshpsHome Cooking2020
Pilot for an experimental virtual lecture, talk show, and Sunday sermon, with a dose of group karaoke thrown in! Using Prem Krishnamurthy’s P!DF, v.6.0.0 as a score, this episode focuses on the idea of ‘bumpiness’ as a form of productive friction and features a number of special guests including Baseera Khan, Connie Samaras, Doug Ashford, Esteban Cabeza de Baca, Karel Martens, Konrad Renner, Jason Dodge, Maria Lind, Marlene McCarty, The Rodina, Wong Kit Yi, WORKac, and others. ——
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PublishersP!WkshpsHome Cooking2020
Sixth and final episode of an experimental virtual lecture, talk show, and Sunday sermon, with a dose of group karaoke thrown in! Using Prem Krishnamurthy’s P!DF, v.6.0.0 as a score, this episode explores the sections called “My Favorite Things”. It features special guests and contributors American Artist, Ane Hjort Guttu with Daisuke Kosugi, Ayana Jamieson, Brian O’Doherty, Catherine Ince, Christopher Kulendran Thomas, Colleen Asper, 
Connie Samaras, Emily Smith, Harold Offeh, James Wines, Jeffrey Weiss, Karel Martens, Leslie Hewitt, Martin Beck, 
Paul O’Neill, Pierre Leguillon, Shelley Streeby, Wong Kit Yi, and others. ——
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This year’s Annual is published in tandem with a long-term installation of The Serving Library’s collection of (mostly) framed objects at 019, an artist-run exhibition, performance and work space in a former welding factory in Ghent, Belgium. Apparently, the sole common denominator of the objects in the collection — which range from paintings, photographs, and record sleeves, to a can of green paint, a German car license plate, and an ouija board — is to have appeared as illustrations in an issue of The Serving Library Annual or one of its immediate antecedents, Bulletins of The Serving Library or Dot Dot ...
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PublisherO-R-G2015
Dutch graphic designer Karel Martens has made clocks for years. Starting somewhere around 1968, Karel attached new faces to existing clock mechanisms to produce graphic compositions, which by their nature, are constantly changing. This screensaver works the same way. Based on a wall clock designed by Karel for his exhibition at P! this fall in New York, the screensaver software uses three yellow and blue spinning disks to display the hours, minutes, and seconds of the current time. It does very little, other than spin contentedly. But, on the way, the passing of time produces a collection of graphic arrangements as ...

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