Pratchaya Phinthong

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Halmos is a collaborative distribution platform and diachronic publisher. It has facilitated new writing and works by numerous artists including Pamela Rosenkranz, Sam Lewitt, Tobias Madison, Dexter Sinister, Mark von Schlegell, Ed Atkins and many others. Halmos projects have been exhibited at the ICA Philadelphia; Objectif Exhibitions, Antwerp; the Museum of Art and Design, NY; Miguel Abreu, NY; Artists Space, NY; Hessel Museum of Art, NY; and Art in General, NY.
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This group exhibition brings together artworks and objects to trace various transformations of meaning, reception, and use over time. The titular metaphor of the whale’s belly—a mythic space separated from lived reality—plays on the residual legacy of the white cube as an allegedly bracketed space of reflection, contemplation and perceptual or political transformation. Just as Jonah, who in the biblical account was swallowed by a whale, and perhaps the visitor, are transformed through isolated meditation, In the Belly of the Whale plays content against its framing to question both how an artifact references a given historical moment and how different modes ...
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The exhibition “In the Heart of the Country” is the first comprehensive presentation of the international collection of the Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw. In a relatively short time—the Museum was established in 2005—the institution has acquired over 300 works. First and foremost, these are works purchased as part of the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage’s “International Collections of Contemporary Art” programme, as well as donations and temporary loans from artists, private individuals and businesses. Many of the collected works were commissioned by the Museum for its exhibitions and public projects (such as pieces by artists like Sanja Iveković, Zbigniew ...
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PublisherHalmos2012
“Weep no more, citizens; they breathe, these celebrated men for whom we cry; our patriotism reanimates them” Presented in honor of Marat and Le Pelletier, “Citizen Sade” wrote this memorial address at the height of violence during the French Revolution, just after the start of the Reign of Terror. The text, effusive and cloyingly patriotic, brings to question the Sade’s own political position – a provocative impulse all the more remarkable given the addresses audience: the gathered Section des Piques, amongst the most hardline Jacobin districts of Paris. Though frequently cited and made infamous as the inspiration for Peter Weiss’ influential ...

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