We are well aware of the limited strength of the left today. Trade unions have been decimated, working class solidarity torn apart, political parties mutated into neoliberal puppets, and social movements channelled into innocuous forms. An entire battery of tactics has been employed to put the left in this position of weakness: legal alterations, increased precarity, global competition, and so on. Yet class power can come from a variety of sources, and a main argument of this paper is that the current weakness of the left is not simply due to a lack of class consciousness, a breakdown of solidarity, or an improper organisational form. While less often acknowledged, infrastructural transformations in the twentieth century have functioned – in both conscious and unintended ways – to undermine the power of the left. The infrastructures of society form the terrain upon which political opponents meet each other and install hegemonic systems…

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