Punctum Books

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Volume 8 is dedicated to The Reversible Destiny Foundation created by Arakawa and Madeline Gins. The Foundation is much more than an architectural practice. It articulates art, philosophy, poetry, architecture and, to some extent, science in a dialogue that benefits each of these disciplines and ultimately serves one of the most radical ideas that apply to architecture: the action of non-dying. Guest authors include Shingo Tsuji, Stanley Shostak, Russell Hughes, and Jean-François Lyotard. Volume 08_Arakawa + Madeline Gins includes: Introduction: Towards an Architecture of Joy — Architectures of Joy: A Spinozist Reading of Parent/Virilio and Arakawa/Gins’s Architecture — Applied Spinozism: Architectures ...
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Volume 11 is devoted to the topic of Cinema: Spike Lee, Béla Tarr, Michelangelo Antonioni and the many other filmmakers named in this volume do not seem to have much in common at first sight; nevertheless, considered through the interpretation of a Spinozist materialist philosophy, their films might have something to say to one another. Take the mud of Red Desert (Antonioni), the volcanic slopes of The Bad Sleep Well (Kurosawa) and the soil of Pina Bausch’s Rite of Spring magnified in Pina (Wenders), for example. What these material manifestations have in common is that they are all in relation with bodies, themselves assemblages of moving matter. Similarly, ...
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Volume 07_Cruel Designs includes: Introduction: What Is Cruel Design? — Violence on the Body: A Manual for the French Police Escorting Illegal Immigrants — The Handcuffs of the Future — The Straightjacket & the Guillotine — The Thanatopolitics of Death Penalty — The Precise Design of Torture in Kafka’s Penal Colony — What Constitutes “the Act of Killing” — The Absolute Power of a Body over Another in Sade — The Corset: “A Body Press,” Paradigm of the Violence of Design on the Body — Carceral Treadmill — To Design a Prison, or Not to Design a Prison: What About ...
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Volume 03_Deleuze includes: Minor Architects and Funambulists: A Shared Architectural Manifesto — Abécédaire — What Is It to Be “From the Left” — The Ritournelle (refrain) as a Territorial Song Invoking the Power of the Cosmos — The Body as a Desiring Machine — Minor Literature — What Remains from Francis Bacon — Transpierce the Mountains: Indian Medieval Art History (by Élie Faure) — Processes of Smoothing and Striation of Space in Urban Warfare — A Thousand Machines (by Gerald Raunig) — Foucault and the Society of Control — Control and Becoming: A Conversation Between Negri and Deleuze — “I ...
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Volume 02_Foucault includes: Foucault and Architecture: The Encounter that Never Was — The Architectural Underestimation — “Do Not Become Enamored with Power” — “Mon Corps, Topie Impitoyable” — The Cartography of Power — The Political Technology of the Body — Architecture and Discipline: The Hospital — Questioning Heterotopology — Foucault and the Society of Control — Quadrillage: Urban Plague Quarantine & Retro-Medieval Boston — The Inscription of Gender in Our Bodies: Norm Production in Foucault and Butler — Modes of Subversion Against the Pharmacopornographic Society: Testo Junkie by Beatriz Preciado — “My Desire is Someone Else’s Fiction” — The Architectural ...
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This book is a collection of thirty-five texts from the first series of guest writers’ essays, written specifically for The Funambulist weblog from June 2011 to November 2012. The idea of complementing Lambert’s own texts on his blog with those written by others originated from the idea that having friends communicate with each other about their work could help develop mutual interests and provide a platform to address an audience. Thirty-nine authors of twenty-three nationalities were given the opportunity to write essays about a part of their work that might fit with the blog’s editorial line. Overall, two ‘families’ of texts emerged, ...
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This book is the second volume of texts curated specifically for The Funambulist since 2011. The editorial line of this second series of twenty-six essays is dedicated to philosophical and political questions about bodies. This choice is informed by Léopold Lambert’s own interest in the (often violent) relation between the designed environment and bodies. Corporeal politics do not exist in a void of objects, buildings and cities; on the contrary, they operate through the continuous material encounters between living and non-living bodies. Several texts proposed in this volume examine various forms of corporeal violence (racism, gender-based violence, etc.). This examination, however, can ...
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Volume 04_Legal Theory includes: Architecture and the Law: An Epistolary Exchange With Dr. Lucy Finchett-Maddock — Remus Has to Die — Trapped in the Border’s Thickness — Absurdity and Greatness of the Law: The Siege of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London — The Space Beyond the Walls: Defensive “A-legal” Sanctuaries — The Reasons for Disobeying a Law — Political Geography of the Gaza Strip: A Territory of Experiments for the State of Israel — Palestine: What Does the International Legislation Say? — In Praise of the Essence of the American Second Amendment: The Importance of Self-Contradiction in a System — ...
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PublisherPunctum Books2012
“Anything can happen for some weird reason; yet also, without any reason, nothing at all can happen.” — Reza Negarestani, Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials Essays, articles, artworks, and documents taken from and inspired by the symposium on Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials, which took place on 11 March 2011 at The New School. Hailed by novelists, philosophers, artists, cinematographers, and designers, Cyclonopedia is a key work in the emerging domains of speculative realism and theory-fiction. The text has attracted a wide-ranging and interdisciplinary audience, provoking vital debate around the relationship between philosophy, geopolitics, geophysics, and art. At once a ...
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Volume 10 is devoted to the topic of Literature, with entries by Lambert and other authors. The idea that architecture can be created through narrative is popular in some academic circles. It seems a fruitful approach to the discipline as it unfolds an important imaginative field. It also envisions a resistance to forms of architectural teleology, since fiction is usually based on the dysfunction of the environment in which it is set. For this reason, we could go as far as to affirm that fiction operates in contradiction to the traditional design method. The word “literature,” however, is not often ...
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Volume 05_Occupy Wall Street includes: Introduction: My Body Is a Political Weapon — Photographs of Occupy Wall Street — “I Am a Citizen of Liberty Square” — Urban Insurgencies: Algiers’ Labyrinthine Casbah vs. New York’s Weaponized Grid Plan — “Mic-Check!”: Human Transmission Technology — “This is What Democracy Looks Like” Is Not Just a Slogan — Why We Should Stop Calling Occupy Wall Street a Protest — Spatial Issues at Stake in Occupy Wall Street: Considering the Privately Owned Public Spaces — The Tremendous Power of Space — The Archipelago as a Territorial Manifesto — About the Notion of Occupying ...
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PublisherPunctum Books2013
For too long, the Earth has been used to ground thought instead of bending it; such grounding leaves the planet as nothing but a stage for phenomenology, deconstruction, and other forms of anthropocentric philosophy. In far too much continental philosophy, the Earth is a cold dead place enlivened only by human thought—either as a thing to be exploited, or as an object of nostalgia. Geophilosophy seeks instead to question the ground of thinking itself, the relation of the inorganic to the capacities and limits of thought. This book constructs an eclectic variant of geophilosophy through engagements with digging machines, cyclones ...

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