Architects

PublishersSMAQRuby Press2016
In this book, stories portray the production of our built environment, guided by three characters: Giraffes, Telegraphs, and Hero of Alexandria. Having developed its long neck to reach the leaves of high trees, the giraffe represents the vernacular approach to architecture, in which construction follows forces of nature. The telegraph, in contrast, embodies the modernist paradigm, in which technology reigns supreme and forces nature to adapt. Inspired by Hero of Alexandria, we subscribe to a third paradigm – using technology to optimize nature and, inversely, nature to assimilate technology. The book is a collection of 13 architecture and urban research projects ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2015
Paris’s Ecole Spéciale d’Architecture (ESA) is 150 years old this year. For the last two years however, this association’s current director, François Bouvard, has imposed a pedagogy and internal politics that is perceived by most students and teachers as profoundly conservative, if not despotic. In the beginning of April 2015, the firing of nine (unionized) members of the school administration has triggered a strike followed by the overwhelming majority of students, as well as many teachers, demanding the director’s resignation, the re-hiring of the nine fired members of the association, as well as a significant shift in the school’s pedagogy. In this conversation, ...
PublisherFailed Architecture2018
Albert Speer is one of the most infamous architects in history. During his time working for the Nazi Party he was responsible for designing the Reich Chancellery and the Zeppelinfeld stadium in which the Nuremberg rallies took place, as well as being in charge of Germany’s war production during the Second World War and being slated to plan the massive reconstruction Berlin as Germania. Yet by emphasising his detachment from the general conditions he was able to avoid the death sentence after the war. While his is an extreme example, it offers a compelling jumping off point to explore the wider ...
PublisherThe Funambulist2015
Sometimes, describing the spatial politics of a city requires to holistically consider its history and geography. Some other times, we may decide to explore a city’s sociality through one of its objects in particular. This is what we do in this conversation with Manar Moursi about her project with David Puig, “Sidewalk Salon.” This particular object is the street chair of Cairo that populates its streets in various forms and involves various forms of politics. In this regard, we focus on the gender aspect of the street chair’s use, as well as the territoriality it implies. The final part of ...
PublisherBenjamin Wells2019
Cities are full of spatial constructs that fuel, frame and glorify the growth agenda. Factories, shopping malls, motorways, tower blocks, petrol stations, speculative housings – all are products of, but also perpetuators of, the narrative of constant growth. These forms and the practices they host are unsustainable, yet we patiently wait for their industries to fade (or crash) into obsoletion before we begin to ponder their possible spatial transformation. Globalisation has been highly effective in de-visualising the effects of unsustainable practices – production is screened from consumption, labour is concealed from play – and this has hindered our ability to ...
Emmett Zeifman is an architect, educator, and writer. He’s the cofounder with Alfie Koetter of Medium Office, a design practice based in Los Angeles and New York, and Project, an independent publication that investigates the possibilities for developing a critical position in contemporary architecture. He also teaches architecture at the Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. In this episode, Emmett and I talk about the relationship between the classroom and the studio, the role of writing in his design practice, and what he learned studying literature.
Kimbro Frutiger is an architect and writer. He studied classical languages and archeology at Amherst College, with a focus on reconstruction of Greek-era sites in Sicily, before receiving an MArch from Yale University’s School of Architecture. Since 2000, he’s written about architecture history and culture for a variety of publications and is currently working on a book. In this episode, Kimbro talks to Jarrett about how his varied educational background influences his work as both an architect and writer, the different types of criticism, and the relationship between his writing and architectural practices.
Reinier de Graaf has been a partner at OMA since 1996. He co-founded the studio’s think tank AMO and has overseen projects ranging from an exhibition of the history of the European Union to masterplans for projects around the world. He has also taught in Harvard’s architecture department and is the author of Four Walls and a Roof: The Complex Nature of a Simple Profession. In this episode, Jarrett and Reinier talk about the origins of AMO and when clients don’t need buildings, the intersections of theory and practice, and why he doesn’t always preach what he practices.
Sam Jacob is an architect, writer, and teacher. He is the founder and director of Sam Jacob Studio, an architecture and design practice based in London, has written for all sorts of architecture publications, and is currently Professor of Architecture at University of Illinois at Chicago and Visiting Professor at Yale School of Architecture. In this episode, Sam and Jarrett talk about how he started writing, the writing classes he’s taught in Chicago, and how reading and writing influence his architecture practice.
PublisherSite Visit2017
Ashley and Erik visit Menards with Ellie Abrons, Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and principal of the architecture firm T+E+A+M, with Thom Moran, Adam Fure and Meredith Miller. Prior to joining Taubman College, Ellie Abrons worked as a project designer in numerous offices such as servo, GregLynnFORM, and Office dA. Ellie is the recipient of residency fellowships at the Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, Germany and The MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire. Her work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale, Storefront for Art and Architecture, A+D Gallery, and the Architectural Association. T+E+A+M ...
PublisherSite Visit2017
Ashley and Erik visit the Michigan League to see a musical with John McMorrough, Associate Professor at the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, and a principal architect in Studio APT (Architecture Project Theory). The building is currently home to a staged production of One Hit Wonder. Written by Jeremy Desmon, this jukebox musical is set to a soundtrack that includes notable one-hit wonders such as “Walking on Sunshine” by Katrina & The Waves and “Closing Time” by Semisonic. John McMorrough’s work is motivated by the conviction that architecture, as a field of knowledge, continually needs to situate ...
PublisherSite Visit2018
This episode of Site Visit was recorded live in Weir Hall, a Victorian Collegiate Gothic building located within Jonathan Edwards College – one of Yale’s first residential colleges. Opening in 1925, Weir Hall, served as the home to the Department of Architecture from until 1963, when the school moved to its current building, Rudolph Hall. Today Weir Court looks over the Art and Architecture Building designed by Paul Rudolph and Louis Kahn’s Yale Art Gallery. Joyce Hsiang is an Assistant Dean and Critic at Yale University’s School of Architecture. Bimal Mendis is an Assistant Dean and Director of Undergraduate Studies at ...
PublisherSite Visit2018
This episode of Site Visit was recorded live in Design with Company’s office, which is located on the Monadnock building’s 14th floor. Erected in 1893, the Monadnock building, designed by two notable Chicago architecture firms Burnham & Root and Holabird & Roche, is considered the world’s tallest load-bearing brick building. The building is prolific in terms of the revolutionary technology employed in its construction, one of the signature contributions of Chicago’s historical architecture. Other notable structures located within proximity to the tower include the Harold Washington Library designed by Thomas Beeby, the Arts Institute of Chicago and Millennium Park. The ...
PublisherSite Visit2018
Paul Andersen is the director of Independent Architecture. His projects range from cruciform bubble gum columns to almost ordinary houses. Paul teaches at UIC and previously taught at the Di Tella, the Harvard GSD, and Cornell University. He has been a guest curator at the MCA Denver and the Biennial of the Americas, a Fulbright Specialist in Architecture, and is the author of The Architecture of Patterns and Curve Culture. On Today’s Site Visit, we return to Colorado and discuss our visit to the US Air Force Academy campus located in Colorado Springs. Built between 1958 and 1968, the campus spans ...
Under Construction imagines a city that is constantly being rebuilt using the same stock of materials. Reuse of building materials is not just a problem of logistics and material flows. It is as much a cultural and architectural problem. One of the most persistent architectural conventions is to consider abstract space before objects and materials. Building elements and furnishings should be subservient to a larger whole. This approach is aligned with a view on the world that is inherited from industrialism, in which any materials could be sourced anew and moulded into shape indefinitely. Reuse, as a conceptual approach to ...
PublisherXX|LA2018
This episode is a live recording of a panel discussion, featuring Association for Women in Architecture and Design (AWA+D) members Lise Bornstein of KFA, Wena Dows of Wena Dows Designs, Marisa Kurtzman of Frederick Fisher and Partners, Brenda Levin of Levin & Associates Architects, Kate Diamond of HDR, and Nina Briggs of The Fabric, moderated by XX|LA host Audrey Sato. It was recorded on Sept. 30 at WUHO, which is Woodbury University’s Gallery space right on Hollywood Boulevard. Our event was held in conjunction with Architexx’s exhibit, “Now What: Advocacy, Activism and Alliances in American Architecture since 1968”.

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