Exhibitions

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The “Free-floating” Srinagar Biennale explores Kashmiri artists’ fractured sense of place through memory, nostalgia, loss and national belonging. Carlson delves into how the Srinagar Biennale adopts an innovative and free-flowing format that allows the Kashmiri community to assert a new visual narrative through a ‘rhizomatic’ approach by engaging viewers in a sensorial experience rather than a visual one.
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A special programme series featuring exhibitions, projects, written works, performances, and set of e-dossiers marking Asia Art Archive’s 15-year anniversary. The participants documented their process and each project has culminated in a set of print and download-on-demand e-dossiers.
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Against Art History critically evaluates decolonial art exhibitions and curatorial frameworks. It asks to what extent art history can be decolonial, when its disciplinary and architectural foundation, the museum, is an inherently colonial institution. Shirazi thus examines whether new curatorial frameworks, such as in Exhibitions Without Objects (EwO) which internationalise the modernist canon of non-Western arts, undo or amplify the violence perpetrated by Euro-American historical narratives.
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Art Biennials and the Mediterranean Conundrum surveys the last twelve editions of Manifesta. Through this examination, the essay evaluates neocolonial strategies that can be used to promote decolonial thinking and exhibition-making. It also situates the biennial as a territory where both fabrication and rethinking of the periphery paradigm occur.
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The Biennals in Pakistan explores popular political, religious and nationalistic dogmas that have influenced art-making in Pakistan since the 1990s. It addresses the gap between the conception and the reception of public art within Pakistani society that has arisen since the country began hosting visual art biennales and festivals in Lahore, Karachi and Islamabad.
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Decolonising Museums is the second thematic publication of L’Internationale Online; it addresses colonial legacies and mindsets, which are still so rooted and present today in the museum institutions in Europe and beyond. The publication draws from the conference Decolonising the Museum which took place at MACBA in Barcelona, 27-29 November 2014 (among the contributors to this thematic issue, Clémentine Deliss, Daniela Ortiz and Francisco Godoy Vega participated at this seminar), and offers new essays, responding to texts published on the online platform earlier this year.
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The implications around climate change have far-reaching consequences but they can also have far-reaching benefits. The e-publication Ecologising Museums explores how museums and cultural institutions can face the issue not only head-on, but from all angles. To what degree are the core activities of collecting, preserving and presenting in fact attitudes that embody an unsustainable view of the world and the relationship between man and nature?
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“In this very moment we are experiencing something unprecedented: the transformation of the art book into an art object. On the one hand, the continual pressure from the market to manufacture books less expensively and make them more affordable can’t be denied. On the other, there is increasing demand for durability, solidity, and quality. The art book itself is becoming a valuable collector’s item. Who wants to acquire a catalogue, an artist’s book, or a catalogue raisonné without believing it will still be a jewel in one’s book collection a decade from now? It’s this kind of book that ...
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Hatshepsut the Drag Queen explores the pitfalls and benefits of non-geographic framing in exhibition-making. Based on Johnson’s own experience as a Middle East North Africa curator at the National Museum of World Cultures in the Netherlands, the essay deconstructs thematic, region-specific exhibitions whilst seeking to expand terms of art viewership by learning from platforms such as the Sharjah Biennial.
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PublisherAperture Foundation2018
In the late 1950s, the Limelight gallery and coffeehouse was the intellectual hangout of Greenwich Village, if not New York. It drew patrons and critics with ten shows per year, featuring the work of such figures as Minor White, Arnold Newman, Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Brassaï, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Robert Frank. When Limelight opened in 1954, it was the first commercial gallery in the US devoted exclusively to photography; along with the Museum of Modern Art, it became the most important venue for serious photography in the city. Helen Gee: Limelight, a Greenwich Village Photography Gallery and Coffeehouse in ...
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The Heritage of 1989. Case Study: The Second Yugoslav Documentspresents a re-enactment of the last big art exhibition in Yugoslavia. Titled Yugoslav Documents ’89, it was curated by the artists Jusuf Hadžifejzović and Rade Tadić and realized under the auspices of the ZOI ’84 Olimpijski centar Skenderija in the 8,000-square-meter Skenderija Center in Sarajevo in 1989. This was surely one of Yugoslavia’s largest exhibitions, if not, indeed, the largest. This re-enactment is interested in Yugoslav Documents primarily because this was the largest exhibition that bore the label “Yugoslav”, a label that, among other things, was meant to strengthen the ideology ...
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Karachi Biennale 2019 seeks to understand the context of visual art biennials in postcolonial South Asian countries, such as Pakistan, Bangladesh and India. It examines the relationship between art organizations and the social status quo through an analysis of Adeela Suleman’s installation Killing Fields of Karachi (2019). The work was subject to censorship during the opening of the Karachi Biennale in 2019.

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