Hearing

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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
Nikita Gale and Alexander Provan are joined by Derica Shields, a writer, researcher, and cultural worker living in London. She speaks about her book-length oral history of Black experiences of the welfare state, “A Heavy Nonpresence,” and the value of listening to Black peoples’ accounts and analyses of their own lives. Shields reflects on her effort to share the stories of Black people who are mistreated and monitored by the state, while also being made to feel that they should be grateful for receiving the assistance to which they’re entitled. Her work shows how, in Britain, liberal nostalgia for the ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2020
“Now we have to learn to listen to the speechless ruins.” A meditation on Black silence.
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PublisherUseless Press2015
Call to Wait is a super-long-term project by Aaron Arntz. It’s a phone line that puts callers on hold for seven years. Holding callers are subject to listening experiments, until they hang up. On next phoning Call to Wait, callers will be re-identified, and before they are reconnected to the audio stream, automatically notified of their remaining time on hold. For example if a caller has been on hold for twenty-one minutes, she will hear that she has thirty-nine minutes, twenty-three hours, one day, fifty-two weeks, and six years remaining. The Call to Wait website keeps track of the numbers that ...
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PublisherChristine Sun Kim2015
In Christine Sun Kim’s video Close Readings, she compiled a selection of film clips and invited deaf friends to provide captions providing possible additions to the films, resulting in a flipping of the typical power dynamic between filmic experience and deaf audiences, where the meaning of the film is dependent on how it is captioned. Here, the hearing viewer is subjected to the captioning of the deaf viewers. Sun Kim has provided us with 11 stills from this video, and a rekindling of our fondest memories of the CEL’s 2013 collaboration with her, “Seeing Voice: The Seven Tone Color Spectrum” ...
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PublisherRadio Web Macba2010
Generative music is a term used to describe music which has been composed using a set of rules or system. This series of six episodes explores generative approaches (including algorithmic, systems-based, formalised and procedural) to composition and performance primarily in the context of experimental technologies and music practices of the latter part of the 20th Century and examines the use of determinacy and indeterminacy in music and how these relate to issues around control, automation and artistic intention. Each episode of this RWM series is followed by a special accompaniment programme of exclusive music by some of the leading sound artists ...
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PublisherTriple Canopy2021
Nikita Gale and Alexander Provan are joined by Tashi Wada, a Los Angeles-based composer and performer. Wada presents Table of Visions, a composition for a “high-resolution player piano” commissioned by Triple Canopy, and asks how we discern between human expression and technical perfection, how we listen to virtuosos and machines. With Gale and Provan, Wada discusses the pandemic-era vogue for liveness at home, technologies that claim to capture the souls of performers, and music that prompts listeners to discern between the sounds of machines and humans. They listen to Conlon Nancarrow, Glenn Gould, Perry Como, advertisements for hi-fi systems, the ...
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Dizziness is more than feeling dizzy. In this multidisciplinary reader, artists, philosophers, and researchers from a range of experimental sciences and cultural studies trace dizziness not only as a phenomenon of sensory input impacting our vestibular system, but also as a twofold phenomenon of “sense”—creating meaning and triggering emotions. It is an interdependence of sense and sensing, of cultural constructs and sensuality, of somatic and cognitive knowledge, that can only be conceived of as a complex relation of both formation and dissolution, habituations and transformations, pertaining to our shared reality and our individual experiences. This is further reflected in the ...
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Beethoven’s deafness designates the lack where all signification is lodged: it appeals to a music not abstract or interior but endowed, one might say, with sensuous intelligibility, with an intelligibility somehow perceivable to the senses. This category is specifically revolutionary, inconceivable in terms of the old aesthetics; the oeuvre which accepts it cannot be received according to pure sensuality, which is always cultural, nor cultural according to an intelligible order which would be that of (rhetorical or thematic) development; without it, neither the modern text nor contemporary music can be accepted. (Roland Barthes, from “Musica Practica”) Ear │ Wave │ Event is ...
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PublisherEar | Wave | Event2014
Ear │ Wave │ Event is tired of hearing that music or sound is beyond language or outside meaning. Ear │ Wave │ Event can’t deal with another hymn to the ethicality of hearing. Ear │ Wave │ Event will scream if another art historian reports “discovering” sound.   Ear │ Wave │ Event does not consider the descriptive cataloguing of audio recordings as criticism.  Ear │ Wave │ Event was founded because there is a growing community of artistic practitioners and theorists who are eager to come together and address those strains of sonic intelligence (material, intellectual, other) that are ...
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PublisherEar | Wave | Event 2015
While we’ve applauded recent moves in art history and media studies challenging the hegemony of the visual, why does the waxing art world topicality of “listening” seem to be inversely proportional to sound practitioners’ waning interest in it? Does it really have to turn up on e-flux before people pay attention? Haven’t musicians, composers, and sound artists all over the world been thinking listening for centuries?… The contributors to Issue 2 face the immense material complexity of listening head on – physically, technically, formally, politically, socially. Their contributions continually orbit the question, ‘What is Listening?,’ all the while deftly dodging all ...
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‘Eavesdropping: A Reader’ addresses the capture and control of our sonic world by state and corporate interests, alongside strategies of resistance. For editors James Parker (Melbourne Law School) and Joel Stern (Liquid Architecture), eavesdropping isn’t necessarily malicious. We cannot help but hear too much, more than we mean to. Eavesdropping is a condition of social life. And the question is not whether to eavesdrop, therefore, but how. Published by City Gallery Wellington in association with Liquid Architecture and Melbourne Law School, on the occasion of the exhibition Eavesdropping, curated by James Parker and Joel Stern, at City Gallery Wellington, 17 August–17 ...
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PublisherFailed Architecture2019
Contemporary urban discourse relies overwhelmingly on visual representation. While it may be more effective both in conveying the actual appearance of a particular urban space and in communicating the intentions of the architect and the planner, this kind of representation leaves little room for individual interpretation and cannot possibly capture the full range of feelings and emotions that people attach to particular places. For this, we must also turn to the more immediate sensations of touch, smell, taste and sound. This episode explores the last of these sensations, considering what it means to represent cities and architecture through sound. Unlike the ...

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