Gilles Deleuze

Cover art
PublisherAfterall2014
Thomas Hirschhorn’s Deleuze Monument was conceived for ‘La Beauté’ in Avignon in 2000. It comprised four elements: a rock inscribed with a quotation, an altar, a monumental sculpture and a library including books by and about Deleuze. Located in the Cité Champfleury, outside Avignon’s historical walls, Deleuze Monument embodied Hirschhorn’s desire to put his work ‘in a difficult situation’ between reality, politics and aesthetics, and marks a significant turning point in his approach to producing and maintaining public works. In this generously illustrated book, Anna Dezeuze examines Deleuze Monument, the second in Hirschhorn’s series of four Monuments, and its relation to ...
Cover art
PublisherThe Volume Project2016
The Lesson of Zoology first appeared in the trash heap of contemporary Lisbon. While researching the role of Lisbon’s Geographical Society in one of the first planetary colonizations, we happened upon an antiquarian bookshop with seemingly endless piles of natural history lithographs. Among them, The Lesson stood out as an especially compelling meta-image of just what a lesson is—an ordering of nature, by way of presentation, about who intended to possess the earth.
Cover art
PublisherThe Volume Project2016
Dear Kris, first I would like to thank you for participating to Unfold as our third guest curator with The Economy is Spinning, a multi-faceted curatorial project on the language of finance and its irrationality. Your Unfold#3 is in fact connected to the exhibition of the same name you have just curated for Onomatopee in Eindhoven and which, as is the case with all Onomatopee’s projects, will also produce a publication. With Unfold the process of translation and transmigration between the exhibition and the publication expands and takes over the space of the digital folder. Could you describe this three-folded relation between the exhibition, the folder and ...
Cover art
PublisherOnCurating.org2018
This issue of OnCurating takes political resistance and sanctuary as its subject, with Herman Melville’s nineteenth-century literary avatar Bartleby—famous for his refrain “I would prefer not to”—as its tutelary spirit. Forms of civil disobedience and tricksterism are coterminous agents in artistic and curatorial practices, both historical and contemporary. How to subvert and subvene, how to recast structural mechanisms of suppression and oppression, how to avoid, deny, magnify, spatially disjoint, and refute (earnestly, comically)? By what means can we, as cultural producers, refuse, while fostering a discourse of reparation? The activism now crucial in the face of ascendant political forces bent ...
Cover art
Publisherre.press2020
This book is an introduction, not to ‘the philosophy’ or ‘the work’ of Gilles Deleuze, but to each of his individual works. A number of general introductions already exist. The synoptic approach that they tend to adopt, however, make an assumption that carries a strong risk, particularly in the case of Deleuze. They assume, in short, that the body of works under consideration are fundamentally homogenous. It is true of course that the synthetic mode of summary sometimes gives rise to insightful and even daring portraits of Deleuze; more frequently it has led to the production of inaccurate and unhelpful ...

We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. Read our privacy policy to learn more. Accept

Join Our Mailing List