Kuba Szreder

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Publishere-flux2016
“How Much Fascism?” asked the curatorial collective WHW. Quite a bit, it would appear. As always, the prefix “neo-” can stand for many differences in the repetition, yet the noun asserts itself with all the subtle grace of an elephant in the room. Historical fascism, too, was a many-headed hydra, and scholarly struggles over exact definitions are ongoing, and will continue, for there is no Platonic Idea, but rather a set of historically grown family resemblances – revolving around tropes such as a cult of strong male leadership that will reverse a country’s decline, the identification of the cause of ...
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Publishere-flux2017
Revolutionaries are people who need to run around in circles. Revolution is a cycle of toppling and replacing, of killing God and building a Church, as Camus says. It is nothing if not intense… Editorial Editors The Intense Life: An Ethical Ideal Tristan Garcia “This Is a Story About Nerds and Cops”: PredPol and Algorithmic Policing Jackie Wang Notes on Blacceleration Aria Dean The Common Before Power: An Example Antonio Negri Productive Withdrawals: Art Strikes, Art Worlds, and Art as a Practice of Freedom Kuba Szreder Self-Destruction as Insurrection, or, How to Lift the Earth Above All That Has Died? Irmgard Emmelhainz The Glory Hole Karen Sherman On the Concept of Beauty Theodor W. Adorno Lounge Act at Thek Lounge Wayne ...
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THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF SOCIAL CREATIVITY The book published by F/SUW in cooperation with MayFly Books gathers papers based on presentations at the conference Labour of the Multitudes? Political Economy of Social Creativity, organized in Warsaw in October 2011. It includes contributions by renowned thinkers and artists, including Luc Boltanski, Neil Cummings, Diedrich Diederichsen, Isabelle Graw, Massimiliano Tomba, Stevphen Shukaitis, and Martha Rosler, among many others. The title Joy Forever refers to the false promise of a common happiness, constantly played out by the proponents of the creative class and creative economy – the very promise that since Romanticism has been ascribed ...
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Living with Ghosts: Legacies of Colonialism and Fascism is a constellation of essays, conversations and images that point to the manner in which the legacies of colonialism and fascism reverberate in our present conjuncture. The impulse for producing this issue was a question of whether it may be possible to trace the connections between the violences of the colonial project through the horrors of fascism to current forms of racism, identitarianism and populism – what we initially called ‘an arc’ of colonialism-nationalism-fascism. These shifts are palpable in the contemporary political uncertainties expressed in this collection of texts. Each of the contributors reflect ...

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