Archaeology

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PublisherNEWPALMYRA2015
NEWPALMYRA is: A Digital Archaeology project, collecting data from international partners, analyzing it, creating a reconstruction of Palmyra in virtual space, and sharing the models and data in the public domain. We are using digital tools to preserve the heritage sites being actively deleted by ISIS. A Cultural Development project, hosting live workshops and building a network of artists, technologists, archaeologists, architects, and others to research, construct models, and create artistic works. A Curatorial project, creating exhibitions and experiences in museums and institutions globally, celebrating the cultural heritage of Syria and the world through the lens of architecture embodying culture and power. Together with ...
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Understanding how pasts resource presents is a fundamental first step towards building alternative futures in the Anthropocene. This collection brings together scholars from a range of disciplines to explore concepts of care, vulnerability, time, extinction, loss and inheritance across more-than-human worlds, connecting contemporary developments in the posthumanities with the field of critical heritage studies. Drawing on contributions from archaeology, anthropology, critical heritage studies, gender studies, geography, histories of science, media studies, philosophy, and science and technology studies, the book aims to place concepts of heritage at the centre of discussions of the Anthropocene and its associated climate and extinction crises ...
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PublisherHatje Cantz2012
This title will be available soon. My dear friend, Quite some time has passed since my last letter, and there are a few urgent matters that I would like to tell you about. One day, when I was writing the place-name “Kassel” on my smartphone, I made a mistake and the word was automatically corrected by the intelligent digital device to “Kabul.” This made me think of the conflicted relationship between the technologies of communication on the one hand, and intentionality and language on the other. In turn, that made me think about conflicts in general (that is, not just war), and then ...
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For the 2019 Oslo Architecture Triennale, Library Stack has compiled a series of essays that map a notional ‘right to loot’ across the urgency of climate crisis and the demand for degrowth. How or when does an unfolding catastrophe manifest a new moral right to dismantle, seize or inhabit the archival, technological, educational, or economic systems producing that crisis? The series finds Shannon Mattern speculating on deep storage archives and their horizon of futurity; Esther Choi on the falsehoods of architecture’s sustainability discourse; Edgardo Civallero and Sara Plaza on the role of libraries in shaping a public consciousness; Rory Rowan ...
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PublisherMeson Press2019
In a world undergoing constant media-driven change, the infrastructures, materialities, and temporalities of remains have become urgent. This book engages with the remains and remainders of media cultures through the lens both of theater and performance studies and of media archaeology. By taking “remain” as a verb, noun, state, and process of becoming, the authors explore the epistemological, social, and political implications.
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Kimbro Frutiger is an architect and writer. He studied classical languages and archeology at Amherst College, with a focus on reconstruction of Greek-era sites in Sicily, before receiving an MArch from Yale University’s School of Architecture. Since 2000, he’s written about architecture history and culture for a variety of publications and is currently working on a book. In this episode, Kimbro talks to Jarrett about how his varied educational background influences his work as both an architect and writer, the different types of criticism, and the relationship between his writing and architectural practices.
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Molly Heintz is the chair of SVA’s MA Design Research program and co-founder of the editorial consultancy Superscript. Prior to this, she studied classics and archeology and has worked at the architecture firms Gensler and Rockwell Group. In this episode, Molly and I talk about her journey from archaeology to design, how to get more designers interested in criticism, writing for a general audience, and the goals of SVA’s design criticism program.
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The history of the Middle East is replete with instances of co-existence between ethnic and religious communities as well as examples of continued endorsement and support for ancient monuments from Antiquity to the Islamic periods.
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PublisherRhizome2016
The .stl and .obj files contained within Material Speculation: ISIS/Download Series (King Uthal) are the first 3D models of a lost artwork openly published by Morehshin Allahyari.
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PublisherThe Funamblist2014
In early May, Gastón Gordillo received me at the University of British Columbia, which allowed us to talk about his upcoming book, Rubble: The Afterlife of Destruction, as well as the essay “Nazi Architecture as Affective Weapon” written for The Funambulist Papers series. We talk about the politics of ruins from Albert Speer’s plans for Third Reich Berlin that was meant to generate glorious ruins to the different types of ruins that exist at the foot of the Andes in North Argentina. There, in contrast to the attitude by local authorities, local people do not view ruins as historic relics that should ...
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PublisherLibrary Stack2018
A conversation between Library Stack and Sam Hardy, a British archaeologist who tracks the black market trade in illicit antiquities. Working from London and Rome, Hardy studies Conflict Antiquities: that’s everything from the looting of ancient objects at unguarded archaeological sites, to thefts from national museum collections, to the anonymous finds of amateurs with metal detectors. Library Stack got in touch with Sam to learn more about his work, and about how this global trade cuts across contemporary politics. Sam spoke at length about how the presumed cultural right to understand the past sometimes pushes against the implicit human right ...
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Slavoj Žižek would have agreed that the destruction of cultural heritage by ISIS and the murder of African-Americans by the police are both examples of “objective violence” because they are easily framed in language and media as the disturbance of normative bourgeois consumerist life. What is at stake in this claim of equivalency? To what extent is representation itself a form of violence?

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