Until recently, there has been a subtle but firm stigma around speaking against the Machine. (Specifically, the Internet.) Since the successful counter-revolution of neoliberal capital, launched in the 1980s against the organicist counter-cultural experiments of the 1960s and 70s, any voices raised against the digital revolution have been dismissed as romantically nostalgic at best, and conservatively neo-Luddite at worst. (Never mind that Ned Lud’s followers, protesting against weaving machines at the beginning of the 19th century, were not necessarily our first “technophobes” but rather an activist group especially attuned to the economic consequences of out- sourcing labor to automated contraptions.) In the past few years the mask has slipped off the increasingly grotesque face of Big Tech, and the public have become more wary of the dangers of social media, thanks in part to the concerns raised by the very same people who created some of our apps’ most addictive features. Such cultural developments have, however, done little to change our actual behavior or usage patterns. Indeed, complaining about social media has become one of the most default positions on social media platforms themselves. So to say, the Zuckerbergs and the Dorseys of this world care little if you critique them and their electronic agoras; as long as you do so on Facebook or Twitter…

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