Jalal Toufic

PublisherTuumba Press2003
Author’s Note to the Second Edition: Why do a second edition of Distracted? Because it is now starkly clear to me that there is a limited number of concepts, figures and postures that a writer is here to create and possibly elaborate (in my case: freezing, diegetic silence-over, over-turn, radical closure with irruption of unworldly ahistorical fully-formed entities, the withdrawal of tradition past a surpassing disaster, etc.). The extra material that was in my first book still awaits its writers—paradoxically getting rid of it is indirectly a way of avoiding future imitators. This version of Distracted is a second edition, in relation ...

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Publishere-flux2010
The tension in contemporary culture formulated in terms of a hackneyed clash between premodern tradition and fully modernized enlightened subjects has proven to be a dangerous one—and it has easily given way to patently racist scenarios in which premodern tribal types (such as the EU citizens who happen to be Roma) invade fully modern Western metropolises. It seems much more useful, and interesting, to consider these conditions to be one and the same—two sides of a single, irreconcilable anxiety with regard to cultural tradition, the promises of modernism, and the shortcomings of both. From this singular vantage point, we can ...

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Publishere-flux2011
Released on October 8, the second issue of the Occupied Wall Street Journal included an editorial note entitled “No list of demands,” responding to the perceived absence of strong messaging offered by the movement. The note specified that:.. Editorial Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle The Time That Remains, Part I: On Contemporary Nihilism Sotirios Bahtsetzis The Contemporary Is Still Forthcoming Jalal Toufic World as Medium: On the Work of Stano Filko Jan Verwoert Queer Temporalities and the Chronopolitics of Transtemporal Drag Antke Engel Neo-Materialism, Part Three: The Language of Commodities Joshua Simon Eupalinos and the Duck: Conceptualism in Recent Architecture Mona Mahall Letters to the Editors: Responses to Jon Rich’s “The Blood ...

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Publishere-flux2011
Americans against capitalism? Arab nations toppling autocrats through peaceful protests? 2011 has been a year of massive popular uprisings—on a completely unexpected scale and from populations that were thought to have been thoroughly subdued. Commentators have predicted that discontent in the Arab world would soon come to a head for so many years that it was beginning to seem unlikely, just as others had begun to dismiss the political potency of popular demonstrations in fiscalized Western democracies. For those who started to think that large-scale, radical optimism was naïve or nostalgic, the events of the past year should be sufficient ...

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Publishere-flux2012
When Hurricane Sandy tore through the Eastern US on the eve of the presidential elections, it seemed that a certain fatigue had found a strange mirror image in the libidinal force of completely absurd weather patterns, that a tired resignation to a lack of options in the political sphere had actually mutated into an apocalyptic revolution in the atmosphere. It was as if a negative omen had come with the prospect that the next global insurgency could arrive by way of non-human forces altogether—totally external to markets, but also to people… Editorial Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle Emancipation of the Sign: Poetry ...

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Publishere-flux2013
Once there was an idea of a vast human family ready to realize humanistic ideals and internationalist partnerships like the United Nations, and some people called it Globalism. But then the idea got bundled with a way of carrying the sentiment of internationalism over to economics, turning jurisdictional partnerships and trade relations into pretty much the same thing. And its name sounds less like a principle than a process—a making global, a globalization of the earth. And since at least the 1980s it was decided that this is how we would all come together, with the globe as market and the ...

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Publishere-flux2013
Dear Readers, welcome to the fiftieth issue of e-flux journal. It marks our official five-year anniversary. It’s hard to believe. To celebrate this, we invite all of you who happen to be in New York next Tuesday, December 17, to a party we are organizing at China Chalet. Join us for drinks and music, we will be there from 9pm until the night ends... Editorial Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle From the Blue Planet to Google Earth Ursula K. Heise Entering the Flow: Museum between Archive and Gesamtkunstwerk Boris Groys Towards the Possible Film (A Script with Some Notable Interruptions) Shezad Dawood If You Prick Us, Do We Not Bleed? No Jalal Toufic Captives ...

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Publishere-flux2014
We are increasingly faced with premodern foundation myths coming from right-wing propaganda and grassroots movements alike. They tell us that some things don’t change and they ask us to think about how original communities are constituted. And we start to wonder whether these original communities are new synthetic fabrications concocted by the limits of communication and exchange, by the failed promises of a liberal democracy or a thriving economy that does not reach people who thought they were entitled to it, and who thus start to look elsewhere. Or do these communities actually contain some real claim to a historical ...

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Publisherse-fluxSternberg Press2014
Jalal Toufic is a thinker whose influence in the Beirut artistic community over the past two decades has been immense—notwithstanding that, as he put it, many, if not all of his books, most of which were published by Forthcoming Books, “continue to be forthcoming even after their publication.” In relation to one of these books, he wondered: “Does not a book titled Forthcoming suggest, ostensibly paradoxically, a second edition?” Here’s the revised edition of Forthcoming, a book first published nearly a decade and a half ago by Atelos press. —Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood, Anton Vidokle

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PublisherForthcoming Books2009
Author’s Note to the Corrected Edition: Gustave Flaubert: “Why are you wasting your time rereading Graziella when one has so many things to reread? That’s an inexcusable distraction” (Lettres de Flaubert (1830-1880), édition Conard, 1926-1930; édition électronique par Danielle Girard et Yvan Leclerc, http://flaubert.univ-rouen.fr/correspondance/; my translation). From November 2009 onwards, one should answer Flaubert’s question thus: I am rereading Graziella—without having read it in the first place! (Flaubert noted the following in a letter to Louise Colet, April 24, 1852: “Let’s chat a little about Graziella. It is a mediocre work, even though it is the best thing Lamartine has done ...

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PublisherForthcoming Books2011
Reading, Rewriting Poe’s “The Oval Portrait” — In Your Dreams Dedicated to William S. Burroughs, the author of My Education: A Book of Dreams, who turned into a writer, then a painter with a shotgun,1 to deal with his murder—while possessed—of his wife The narrator of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Oval Portrait” arrives in a desperately wounded condition at a deserted chateau with his valet. How was the narrator mortally wounded? Neither Poe nor the narrator tells us about that. Given that we are not provided with a specific reason for the wound, it is appropriate to look for a general, ...

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PublisherForthcoming Books2009
If the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and 9, 1945, respectively, are a surpassing disaster then beyond not only the immediate death toll and the manifest destruction of buildings, including museums, libraries and temples, and of various other sorts of physical records, but also the long-term hidden material effects, in cells that have been affected with radioactivity in the “depth” of the body, and the latent traumatic effects that may manifest themselves après coup, there would be an additional immaterial withdrawal of literary, philosophical and thoughtful texts as well as of certain films, videos, and musical ...

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PublisherForthcoming Books2007
Against the prevalent post-traumatic amnesia encountered in post-war Lebanon, and which is exempli ed by the unjust and scandalous general amnesty law that was passed by parliament on 28 March 1991 (Law No. 84/91) and that pardoned all political crimes prior to its enactment with the exclusion of “crimes of assassination or attempted assassination of religious gures, political leaders, and foreign or Arab diplomats,” writers and lmmakers should have devised af rmative scenarios and strategies either to remember or not to remember: — Not to remember—without forgetting. He could no longer stand their post-traumatic amnesia and so he volunteered for one ...

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Posthumous Introduction to the First Edition: Writing the introduction after finishing the rest of the book, my memory is coming back to me, and so at present I can give some indication in what context to place it. Why write on vampires in 1992? It is precisely because vampire films and novels are back in fashion (Coppola’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula …) that one should ask: why on vampires now, by what coincidence? How come what functions in the too-late and too-early mode is being written about now, when it has become fashionable? But isn’t it characteristic of telepathy that it reaches ...

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PublisherGaleri Nev Istanbul2010
What Is the Sum of a Night of Jouissance and a Night of Desire? In A Thousand and One Nights, missing his younger brother, King Shāh Zamān, King Shahrayār invites him to visit him. While on the point of heading to his brother from his camp on the outskirts of his capital, King Shāh Zamān remembers something he had forgotten in his palace. He heads back and discovers that his wife is betraying him with a slave. He slaughters her and her partner. Then he heads to his brother. The latter notes his brother’s depression; he ascribes it erroneously to ...

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“Teaching Philosophy” Many university search committees ask for the applicant’s “teaching philosophy” in announcements of academic vacancies. They must be using the term “philosophy” flippantly and sloppily, since very few people (Plato [The Republic, etc.], Nietzsche [in his texts on breeding, etc.] …) have ever had a teaching philosophy. From: Diamanda Galás Sent: March 31, 2006 12:52:21 AM To: jtoufic@hotmail.com Hello, Many years ago a book was found by me in my study and I had no idea how it got there. I then observed a dedication. Throughout the years I have perused it and this year I began to leave it out on ...

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